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A Q & A with Steve Martin

February 29, 2016

by Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

21STEVE-MARTIN 400.jpgMere mention of Steve Martin's name instantly evokes a multitude of references to his iconic comedic work over the past five decades. But there's so much more to the man than just a wild and crazy guy. Over the past five or so years, Martin has turned his focus toward music, working with both Steep Canyon Rangers and Edie Brickell. Last year, he and Brickell released their second duo album, 'So Familiar,' and set into motion a Broadway musical, 'Bright Star: A New Musical' -- directed by Walter Bobbie and running now at the Cort Theatre.

Kelly McCartney: For this musical partnership with Edie to work, do both of you have to be super-conscious about carving out time from your myriad other commitments?

Steve Martin: No, because this is a focus of ours and I find ... Together, we've written about 40 songs, between the musical and two albums -- not to mention ones we discarded. [Laughs] Not that they were bad, but they were inappropriate for the musical. But, anyway, Edie loves to write songs. Just loves it. Everyone once in a while, I'll just sit down and say, "I haven't written a song for a while..." or just absent-mindedly be playing and start to come into a tune and I'll send it off to her.

Because you're so broadly creative with so many various interests, where do you find your melodic inspirations? Nature? Art? Life?

Well, sometimes it's as simple as, "The last song I wrote was fast. I wonder if I can write something slow." Or, "The last song I wrote was written in double-C tuning, let me try open-G tuning." Or, "The last song was on the three-finger bluegrass banjo, let me try the baritone banjo." You keep jumping around and you keep putting your fingers down in unusual places. [Laughs] And it creates music, often.

Do you lay the music down and have Edie bring the lyrics and melody? Or... what's the division of duties between you two?

Yeah. Occasionally, she'll follow my melody and, occasionally, she won't. It can be all over the place. Or she might follow my melody for four bars then go off on her own or completely ignore it. Or, sometimes, a banjo tune has no melody. It's just kind of a track, so anything can happen there.

What do you get from music, creatively, that you don't get from the other aspects of your work?

One thing is, you can do it at home. [Laughs]

[Laughs] Fair enough!

Also, it's open to interpretation by others because I think Edie and I both enjoy having our songs sung by such talented people, for example, as in the musical. We love to hear that the song actually translates to someone else's voice and interpretation. We like that.

I would assume music's universal appeal probably plays a part in that difference.

Yes. Also, it's a little bit like writing a play, in that other people are going to do it. It's very satisfying when you hear that it's working and is coherent and logical and even emotional.

Does 'Bright Star' serve as a sort of convergence point for your various interests and paths? Or is it something different still?

No, it certainly does. It certainly converges in many ways -- music, playwriting, humor...

Which, you're known for that a little bit.

[Laughs] Yeah. A little bit. Also, collaboration. When I started in show business, I started as a writer on The Smothers Brothers Show and learned the collaborative process. Through my life, I've found what collaborating can do. There's a certain part of me -- and on certain things -- that I don't want to collaborate, so I go off and write a song on my own just to prove I can still do it. Or write a play completely without any other contributions. In the musical, there are definitely musical contributions and people are writing transitions and they are writing choral arrangements for the ensemble, so it's a very collaborative process.

Coming from those days with the Smothers Brothers on down, what did you have to do for people to take you seriously as a musician -- besides have some solid chops? How did you convince them?

It's kind of a funny story. It's not a funny story; it's a long story. When I started doing my comedy act, which seemed so -- in teen parlance -- "random" ... I could play the banjo and I would incorporate the banjo, even as the act was forming, just to show I could do something. Because it didn't look like I was doing anything, comedically. It looked like I was goofing off. But that was an illusion. It was really well thought-out. But I had the banjo in there. I wouldn't play it much -- I played maybe a song-and-a-half or used it for some comedy -- and I would always play a legitimate song.

So, when the time came for me to be serious about it. Which I was... I was always serious in the '70s, too, and I recorded some songs on the back of a comedy album that I recorded in the '70s. But, anyway, we're talking now about, essentially, the year 2000 or maybe 1999 or so... I had been playing the banjo for almost 50 years. And I met up with the Steep Canyon Rangers. When we started doing the show, I would always incorporate humor into the show and they're fantastic. And I always played my own songs. And, for some reason, there was no backlash. The bluegrass world was very welcoming. They were very nice and would share knowledge and contribute ideas. For some reason, I don't know, there just didn't seem to be a backlash and that's been great. I like to think the tunes speak for themselves and the playing speaks for itself.

Even with having to overcome preconceived notions, when you do step on stage with Steep Canyon Rangers, that's instant street cred, right there, with the bluegrass crowd.

Right. That's true. Whenever we performed, I also tried to do a show and not just stand there with my back turned to the audience and play. I think a lot of people who... let's say actors who want to become, who are musicians, their goal is to become a rock 'n' roll star, not a musician who is playing music. And I always thought, "No. We're going to really play music here, as best we can." I'd do some comedy in between, so it sort of greased the way for the audience.

So... banjos often get a bad rap. What is it about that particular instrument for you? As in, if you had to explain the merits and mirth of the banjo to someone, what would you say?

Well, I find the instrument to be very emotional. I find it capable of inducing melancholy and drama and, obviously, the excitement of tempo. It can be played fast or slow. And I think the reputation of the banjo has changed quite a bit. There were always banjo fans and banjo lovers, but during the '70s, it got linked with... "hillbilly" is the wrong word, but kind of Hee-Haw, corn pone, hay bales, and all that.

And Deliverance.

Yes, that's right. Although I always found that scene quite moving. I didn't really find it bad for the banjo, but I guess other people did. But, even when the banjo was played in the 1940s by Earl Scruggs, they always wore suits and ties. They did not promote the image of corn pone. And, right now, you have players like Bela Fleck and Norm Pikelny and Ryan Cavanaugh. Bela Fleck can sit in with any jazz musician in the world and play in front of symphonies. He's written concertos and performed them with orchestras. The capacity for the banjo is there.

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Steve Martin & Edie Brickell's latest album, 'So Familiar' is out now via Rounder Records and available via iTunes and Amazon.com.

Upcoming tour dates

'Bright Star - A New Music' - ticket info






Posted by Linda Fahey at 7:00 PM

Album Review: Dylan LeBlanc, 'Cautionary Tale'

February 26, 2016

by Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Dylan LeBlanc Cautionary Tale 600.jpgLike Jason Isbell and so many others before him, singer/songwriter Dylan LeBlanc hit bottom a few years back and emerged with a brilliant recounting and reckoning in the form of his new Cautionary Tale. Produced by John Paul White (formerly of the Civil Wars) and Ben Tanner (of the Alabama Shakes), the early '70s-inspired album opens with a title track/mission statement that calls everything on the table into question: "Not much to be said when my heart and my head still deceive me," he acknowledges with a knowing lyrical shrug. "Don't offer up help that you know that I won't be needing, 'cause I do it to myself like I never get tired of bleeding." As they say, the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem. Well... mission accomplished... several times over.

On song after glorious song, the singer struggles to find his existential footing, as he stands on the rather unsteady, if not altogether unfamiliar, ground of sobriety. "Cross my heart and hope to die... unless you got something better," LeBlanc offers in "Easy Way Out," as he culls through the options at hand sounding more than a little like Gold Rush-era Neil Young. It's when he turns his gaze back to his past that the causes and complaints come into sharper focus: "The lash I felt from the Bible belt brought me down on my knees, when I thought that I could stand on my own two feet. Now thorazine dreams are thundering in dangerous weather. In my head, I'll soon be dead or soon feeling better." Thankfully, the latter came to pass.

For being in his mid-20s, LeBlanc has walked through more darkness than most will ever see. That he has turned those experiences into a piece of art this honest and honorable makes it all the more remarkable. Not surprisingly, Cautionary Tale is very much this year's Southeastern.

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Cautionary Tale is out now via Single Lock Records and is available at iTunes and Amazon.com.

Upcoming Tour Dates






Posted by Linda Fahey at 3:51 PM

A Q & A with Birds of Chicago

by Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

JT and Allison 400sq.jpgBirds of Chicago -- the duo of JT Nero and Allison Russell -- have never made big splashes with their music. They prefer small ripples... the kind that undulate out as far as the eye can see. Their subtle brand of artistry was put into the hands of producer Joe Henry and came out all the better for it on 'Real Midnight.' It's a collection of heartfelt and soul-filled songs that, just like those ripples, run much deeper than the surface might suggest.

Kelly McCartney: The idea of music as a sort of saving grace seems to be one of your basic tenets. In what ways has it saved the two of you -- spiritually or otherwise?

JT Nero: It's a saving grace, a life raft, daily bread, and water. It's interesting how when you get to a certain point in life -- where you've tasted real loss, real aloneness, real love, and the absence of real love -- well, some of the things you might have paid lip service to, that are easily voiced in clich├ęs such as "music heals" or "music brings people together" come back to you as if written in flames: MUSIC HEALS! MUSIC BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER! Other things heal, other things bring people together, but not quite the same way. A day without it is a terrifying day, to me.

During these awfully tumultuous world times, do you guys feel any sort of quickening that demands or begs you to counter it with a more meaningful and hopeful message?

JT: There's no doubt that's part of it. One thing we know is, whether or not our world is more or less troubled than it's ever been before, we know we are much more acutely aware of those troubles. That hyperawareness of everything rotten -- in our neighborhoods and literally all over the world, in essentially real time -- that's good and that's terrible. My reaction, as a person and as a poet, to feelings of chaos, of incurable, endless human awfulness has always been to get small, to catch moments, memories, feelings like fireflies in a jar. That makes me feel better. Hopefully it makes other people feel a little better, too.

These musical sutras of yours have been called "secular gospel" as a way to convey their breadth and depth. Is that a comfortable tag? Or are we, collectively, missing a bigger, broader point?

JT: I get it. I embrace it to a degree. I am also a little wary of it, because I have many friends in the actual gospel community for whom the term "gospel" refers specifically to the Evangelical mission and I have great respect for that tradition. Having said that, the designation is a lot closer to what we seem to be doing than a lot of other phrases that could be thrown out there.

Great gospel music starts with this basic notion: Beautiful words, beautiful melodies bring you closer to God. We operate on a similar principle -- and, again, it's one that can sound a little trite, potentially -- words and music can bring us closer to each other. I believe in the power of words, sung words, to link people's spirits in a way no other thing can on this earth. So we try to bring as much grace and succulence to those words and melodies as possible.

Another intriguing part of your approach is the intentional underwhelm -- everything feels deliberately, beautifully understated. You're not shouting loudly on a street corner. You're sitting quietly on a park bench. Was that, in fact, a conscious choice?

JT: I am going to collapse these last two questions together, because they are interwoven, to my mind. I think there is definitely a "still waters run deep" ethic on this record. Part of what I think you are referring to starts with Allison's singing. (She's napping with the baby right now, so she won't be able to step in and stop me from bragging on her.) Alli has become a pretty miraculous singer -- and a great "under-singer." I put her in a tradition that spans from Dinah Washington to Roberta Flack to Ma Carter. She can bring a lot of fire when needed, but more often it's her restraint and nuance that make what's she's singing pack such a wallop, so writing for a singer, an interpreter of that caliber makes you want to rise to the occasion..

When this project started, we had our sights set on Joe Henry, from the start. There's no doubt that this bunch of tunes are connected by a certain somber, reckoning tone. Nobody builds a righteous, melancholy space for great singers to deliver a song like Joe and his usual suspects: engineer Ryan Freeland and drummer/shaman Jay Bellerose. I had heard records that Joe had produced that were magically, wonderfully sad and uplifting at the same time. We wanted in on that, and we had the songs that felt very right for it.

What did Joe Henry bring to the mix that wasn't previously there -- or that, perhaps, only he could bring?

JT: Joe pulls off the small miracle of putting artists at their ease and letting them reconnect with the essence of the song in the studio. It's a well-documented thing that, for any number of reasons, some of the basic joy of music making can be lost in the recording studio. It's almost expected. That proposition, I think, has always seemed ridiculous to Joe, and he built a collective of musicians and a physical space that absolutely disallows the existence of any sort of weird vibes.

By the way, we had the very bittersweet honor of being the last band to record in Joe's Garfield House studio in South Pasadena. So much good music was made there. The house was being put up for sale the actual week we were there. I somewhat belatedly realized how heavy that must have been for Joe and his guys, but were we ever glad we got in under the wire.

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'Real Midnight' is out now and available via iTunes and Amazon.com

Upcoming tour dates





Posted by Linda Fahey at 3:25 PM

PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160218

February 25, 2016

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160218. Aired between February 19 - February 25, 2016. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

Hour 1

The Ballroom Thieves - Here I Stand - A Wolf In the Doorway - Blue Corn

Tall County - Sweetgrass - Featherweight - Tall County

Valerie June - Wanna Be On Your Mind - Pushin' Against a Stone - Sunday Best

Dylan LeBlanc - Easy Way Out - Cautionary Tale - Single Lock

Laura Marling - Easy - Short Movie - Ribbon Music

Steve Martin & Edie Brickell - Won't Go Back - So Familiar - Rounder/Concord

Paul Simon - Under African Skies - Graceland - Warner Bros.

Della Mae - No Expectations - Della Mae - Rounder

Rolling Stones - Dead Flowers - Sticky Fingers - Rolling Stones

The Pines - Where Something Wild Still Grows - Above the Prairie - Red House

The String Cheese Incident - Elvis' Wild Ride - Born On The Wrong Planet - Whibbletus

Dave Ray - Wild About Her - Legacy - Red House

Carrie Rodriguez - Perfidia - Lola - Luz Records

The Mavericks - (Waiting For) The World To End - Mono - The Valory Music Co.

Hour 2

Kathy Kallick Band - I'm Not Your Honey Baby Now - Foxhounds - Live Oak

The Small Glories - No Friend of Mine - Songs by Cara Luft & JD Edwards (EP) - The Small Glories

Lucinda Williams - Ghosts of Highway 20 - The Ghosts of Highway 20 - Highway 20 Records

Leon Redbone - Ghost of the St. Louis Blues - Sugar - BMG

Eliza Carthy (compilation) - Thirty-Foot Trailer - Joy of Living: A Tribute to Ewan MacColl - Compass

Norma Waterson - Black Muddy River - Norma Waterson - Hannibal

Birds of Chicago - Estrella Goodbye - Real Midnight - Five Head Entertainment

Birds of Chicago - Real Midnight - Real Midnight - Five Head Entertainment

Larry Keel - Ripchord - Experienced - Larry Keel

Sierra Hull - Compass - Weighted Mind - Rounder

John Moreland - Cherokee - High On Tulsa Heat - Old Omens (Thirty Tigers)

The Milk Carton Kids - The City of Our Lady - Monterey - ANTI

Rhiannon Giddens - Didlbox (Mouth Music) - Factory Girl (EP) - Nonesuch



Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show, hosted by Elena See, is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 40 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 4:23 PM

PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160211

February 21, 2016

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160211. Aired between February 12 - February 18, 2016. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

(Valentine's Day special)

Hour 1

Buddy & Julie Miller - Gasoline and Matches - Written In Chalk - New West

The Honey Dewdrops - Catawba - Silver Lining - The Honey Dewdrops

Quiles & Cloud - Deep Ellum Blues - Beyond the Rain - Compass

Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn - Little Birdie - Folk Alley in-studio session recording - Folk Alley in-studio session

Norman & Nancy Blake - Rise When The Rooster Crows - The Morning Glory Ramblers - dualtone

*Jeffrey Foucault & Kris Delmhorst - Left This Town (in-studio)-- Folk Alley Exclusive - Live from the 2016 30A Songwriters Festival - Folk Alley Exclusive

*Jeffrey Foucault & Kris Delmhorst - This Ain't Heaven (in-studio) - Folk Alley Exclusive - Live from the 2016 30A Songwriters Festival - Folk Alley Exclusive

Mandolin Orange - Old Ties and Companions - Such Jubilee - Yep Roc

David Wax Museum - Beekeeper - Carpenter Bird - David Wax Museum

Gillian Welch - The Way It Goes - The Harrow & The Harvest - Acony

*Mike + Ruthy - Bright As You Can (in-studio) - Exclusive Folk Alley in-studio recording - Folk Alley Exclusive

*Jay Ungar & Molly Mason Family Band (in studio) - Ashokan Farewell - Exclusive Folk Alley in-studio recording - Folk Alley Exclusive

Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion - Hangnot - Ribbon of Highway Endless Skyway - Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion

Shovels & Rope - (What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love & Understanding (feat. Lucius) - Busted Jukebox, Volume 1 - Dualtone

Over The Rhine - I'm on a Roll - The Trumpet Child - Red Eye


Hour 2

Kelly Willis & Bruce Robison - I'll Go To My Grave Loving You - Our Year - Premium Records

The Quiet American - Quail Parade - Wild Bill Jones - The Quiet American

Dave Carter & Tracy Grammer - Gentle Arms of Eden - Drum Hat Buddha - Signature Sounds

Bob Dylan & Joan Baez - Mama You've Been On My Mind - LIVE 1964 - Columbia

Bob Dylan & Joan Baez - With God On Our Side - LIVE 1964 - Columbia

Harvey Reid & Joyce Andersen - Moonshiner's Blues - The Great Sad River - Woodpecker

Pharis & Jason Romero - Long Gone Out West Blues - Long Gone Out West Blues - Lula

Birds of Chicago - Remember Wild Horses - Real Midnight - Five Head Entertainment

Brown Bird - Patiently Waiting - Axis Mundi - Supply and Demand Music

Richard and Linda Thompson - I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight - I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight - Island

Ricky Skaggs & Sharon White - If I Needed You - Seldom Scene 15th Anniversary - Sugar Hill

Al Petteway & Amy White - Baker's Dozen - Gratitude - Solid Air

Mollie O'Brien & Rich Moore - Train Home - Love Runner - Remington Road

Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams - Ain't Nobody For Me - Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams - Red House

Albert & Gage - I Used To Be Lonesome - Burnin' Moonlight - Moon House



Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show, hosted by Elena See, is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 40 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes, Live 365 and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 12:53 PM

PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160204

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160204. Aired between February 5 - February 11, 2016. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

Hour 1

Tall Heights - Two Blue Eyes - Holding On, Holding Out (EP) - Tall Heights

Tommy Emmanuel - T. E. Ranch - It's Never Too Late - CGP Sounds / Thirty Tigers

Jorma Kaukonen - Genesis - Quah - Relix

Susie Glaze & the Hilonesome Band - Dens of Yarrow - Not That Kind of Girl - HiLonesome

Trad.Attack! - Thighs (Reied) - Trad.Attack (EP) - Trad.Attack

Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams - Surrender To Love - Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams - Red House

The Weepies - My Little Love - Sirens - Nettwerk

Robin & Linda Williams - That's The Way Love Goes - Buena Vista - Red House

Lucinda Williams - Place In My Heart - The Ghosts of Highway 20 - Highway 20 Records

The Wood Brothers - Raindrop - Paradise - Honey Jar Records/Thirty

The Small Glories - Oh My Love - Songs by Cara Luft & JD Edwards (EP) - The Small Glories

Luther Dickinson - Horseshoe (Reprise) - Blues & Ballads (A Folksinger's Songbook) Volumes I & II - New West

Tall County - Angel - Featherweight - Tall County

The Pines - Aerial Ocean - Above the Prairie - Red House

Pieta Brown - Flowers of Love - Paradise Outlaw - Red House


Hour 2

Keb' Mo' - The Old Me Better feat. The California Feet Warmers - Bluesamericana - Kind of Blue Music

Pine Leaf Boys - Creole Mardi Gras - Blues de Musicien - Arhoolie

Dr. John - Tipitina - The Very Best of Dr. John - Rhino

Joan Shelley - Over and Even - Over and Even - No Quarter

John Renbourn - Buffalo - The Attic Tapes - Riverboat Records / World

Jake Bugg - Note To Self - Jake Bugg - Island

Loretta Lynn - Everything It Takes (feat. Elvis Costello) - Full Circle - Sony Legacy/Loretta Lynn

Loretta Lynn - High On A Mountain Top - Van Lear Rose - Interscope

Darlingside - Harrison Ford - Birds Say - Thirty Tigers

Caitlin Canty - Unknown Legend - Reckless Skyline - Caitlin Canty

The Suitcase Junket (in-studio) - Twisted Fate (in-studio) - Folk Alley in-studio session - Folk Alley/WKSU exclusive

Graham Nash - This Path Tonight - This Path Tonight - Blue Castle

Crosby, Stills and Nash - Guinnevere - Crosby, Stills And Nash - Atlantic

Aubrie Sellers - Losing Ground - New City Blues - Aubrie Sellers Music/Thirty

Beppe Gambetta & Tony McManus - Moustambeiko - Round Trip - Borealis

Tim O'Brien - The Water Is Wise - Pompadour - Howdy Skies



Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show, hosted by Elena See, is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 40 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes, Live 365 and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 12:40 PM

Song Premiere: William Fitzsimmons, "People Change Their Minds"

February 9, 2016

by Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

fitzsimmons.jpg"You were just a boy when she moved on, though I'm told that you were better off," William Fitzsimmons whisper-sings in "People Change Their Minds" as he ponders the story before him. "Still I wonder if you wonder, too, where did she go." The tenderness of his handling reflects the depth of his contemplation.

The song comes from Fitzsimmons' Charleroi album, which is a complementary project to Pittsburgh. He clarifies, "The Pittsburgh album was about the grandmother I knew. Charleroi is about the one I never did." This track focuses on his father's abandonment as a baby -- and the wounds such a situation leaves that require a lifetime to heal, if they ever do. As evidenced by Fitzsimmons' own digging into the story, some of that questioning gets handed down through the generations, as well.

"My father was returned to the hospital as an infant, ill with whooping cough," he says. "He was left there for several months as an orphan. Finally, he was adopted by a kind doctor who became his father. Never knowing his birth family, it was assumed that mystery would always remain. In 2015, after over 60 years of wondering and waiting, the family was finally found. Having been mistakenly told that my father died in infancy, he was never sought out by the remainder of his biological family. Sadly, his mother passed away several years before having a chance to ever see her son again. Her name was Thelma and she was my grandmother. She was from Charleroi, Pennsylvania. These songs are about her."

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Charleroi: Pittsburgh Volume 2 is out on April 1 via Nettwerk, and is available for pre-order at Amazon.com.

Upcoming tour dates



Posted by Ann VerWiebe at 1:53 PM

PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160128

February 3, 2016

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160128. Aired between January 29 - February 4, 2016. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

Hour 1

Foghorn Stringband - Mining Camp Blues - Devil In the Seat - Foghorn Music

Matt Flinner Trio - Shiny Blue - Traveling Roots - Compass

Grant Dermody - Ain't Going Back - Sun Might Shine On Me - Grant Dermody

Aoife O'Donovan - Porch Light - In The Magic Hour - Yep Roc

The Punch Brothers - My Oh My - The Phosphorescent Blues - Nonesuch

The Cactus Blossoms - Stoplight Kisses - You're Dreaming - Red House

The Cactus Blossoms - You're Dreaming - You're Dreaming - Red House

Jason Isbell - Speed Trap Town - Something More Than Free - Southeastern

Sam Lewis - Little Time - Waiting On You - Brash Music

Sierra Hull - The In-Between - Weighted Mind - Rounder

Quiles & Cloud - By the Rio Grande - Beyond the Rain - Compass

Richard Gilewitz - Freight Train - thumbsing - Gillazilla

Dolly Parton - Jolene - Live And Well - Sugar Hill

Susie Glaze & the Hilonesome Band - The Mountain - Not That Kind of Girl - Hi Lonesome

Levon Helm - The Mountain - Dirt Farmer - Vanguard


Hour 2

Ashleigh Flynn - Dirty Hands and Dirty Feet - A Million Stars - Home Perm

Kathy Kallick Band - Kentucky Mandolin - Foxhounds - Live Oak

Kate Campbell - Some Song - The K.O.A. Tapes (Vol.1) - Large River

The Pines - Hanging From the Earth - Above the Prairie - Red House

The Pines - There In Spirit - Above the Prairie - Red House

Aubrie Sellers - Humming Song - New City Blues - Aubrie Sellers Music/Thirty

Robby Hecht - Papa's Down the Road Dead - Robby Hecht - Old Man Henry

Hayes Carll - Another Like You - KMAG YOYO (& other American stories) - Lost Highway

Madisen Ward & the Mama Bear - Yellow Taxi - Skeleton Crew - Glassnote Entertainment

Tall County - Oh Henry - Featherweight - Tall County

The Small Glories - Black Waterside - Songs by Cara Luft & JD Edwards (EP) - The Small Glories

Pentangle - The Trees They Do Grow High - Sweet Child - Shanachie

Solas - Nil Na La - Solas - Shanachie

Peter Lang - Muggy Friday - The Thing at Nursery Room Window - Takoma

Langhorne Slim & the Law - Meet Again - The Spirit Moves - Dualtone Music Group



Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show, hosted by Elena See, is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 40 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes, Live 365 and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 10:00 AM

PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160121

February 1, 2016

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #160121. Aired between January 22 - January 28, 2016. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

Hour 1

The Slocan Ramblers - Pastures of Plenty / Honey Babe - Coffee Creek - The Slocan Ramblers

Pete Huttlinger - The Hatch - Catch And Release - Instar

Linda McRae - Charlie Parr - Shadow Trails - Borealis

Charlie Parr - Stumpjumper - Stumpjumper - Red House

Tedeschi Trucks Band - Hear Me - Let Me Get By - Fantasy/Concord

The Young Novelists - Hear Your Voice - Made Us Strangers - The Young Novelists

Kathy Kallick Band - Foxhounds - Foxhounds - Live Oak

The Waybacks - Good Enough - Loaded - Compass

Rita Hosking - A Better Day - Frankie and the No-Go Road - Rita Hosking

Aoife O'Donovan - Hornets - In The Magic Hour - Yep Roc

Matt Flinner Trio - Heads-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump - Traveling Roots - Compass

Darrell Scott - Every Road Leads Back To You - Long Ride Home - Full Light

Tim O'Brien - Father of Night - Red On Blonde - Sugar Hill

Luther Dickinson - My Leavin' - Blues & Ballads (A Folksinger's Songbook) Volumes I & II - New West

Hour 2

Red Moon Road - I'll Bend But I Won't Break - Sorrows and Glories - Red Moon

Jayme Stone - Julie and Joe - Jayme Stone's Lomax Project - Borealis

The Cactus Blossoms - Clown Collector - You're Dreaming - Red House

Larry Keel - Fill 'em Up Again - Experienced - Larry Keel

Del McCoury Band - 40 Acres and a Fool - MoneyLand - McCoury

Kris Delmhorst - Hushabye - Blood Test - Signature Sounds

Jeffrey Foucault - Mesa, Arizona - Ghost Repeater - Signature Sounds

Peter Mulvey - Trempealeau - Silver Ladder - Signature Sounds

Mavis Staples (feat. Valerie June) - High Note - Livin' On A High Note - Anti

Valerie June - Somebody To Love - Pushin' Against a Stone - Sunday Best

Quiles & Cloud - Black Sky Lightning - Beyond the Rain - Compass

Quiles & Cloud - Shake Me Know - Beyond the Rain - Compass

Austin Plaine - Your Love - Austin Plaine - Washington Square

Peter Huttlinger - The Silver Spear - Catch And Release - PH

The Wainwright Sisters - Hobo's Lullaby - Songs in the Dark - Pias America



Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show, hosted by Elena See, is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 40 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes, Live 365 and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 2:40 PM

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