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Album Review: Kristin Diable, 'Create Your Own Mythology'

April 29, 2015

by Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Kristin Diable Mythology.jpgKristin Diable's 'Create Your Own Mythology' is an absolute gem of a record. Right out of the gate, the first track is equal parts Dusty Springfield, Lissie, and Neko Case, bringing the best from those renowned artists to bear in one crazy-great piece. Next up, "Hold Steady" deploys a slinky, shuffling groove and stretches out toward Amy Winehouse and Duffy territory, and darn if it doesn't pretty much get there. If the rest of the album cleared those two bars, 'Create Your Own Mythology' would be a real masterpiece. But the rest of the album falls just shy, leaving the set to settle for tags like 'admirable effort,' 'remarkable debut,' and, of course, 'absolute gem.'

Still, after the pair of openers brings you to the edge of your seat, buckle on up for the ride to come. From "Time Will Wait" through the closer, these are well-crafted, superbly rendered tunes that do, in fact, create a certain mythology of their own. Even surrounded by and immersed in a world of her own making, it's clear that Diable can sing. And she does so with not just her voice, but her heart and soul, as well -- a skill sorely lacking in many of today's more vigorous vocalists.

Producer Dave Cobb sure knows how to pick 'em. Cobb already has records by Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Nikki Lane, and Shooter Jennings in his portfolio, and Diable's makes a fine addition.

'Create Your Own Mythology' is out now via Thirty Tigers. Available here.

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Posted by Linda Fahey at 9:48 AM

Hear It First - Charlie Parr, 'Stumpjumper'

April 20, 2015

charlie-bio-pic 300 sq.jpgby Elena See for FolkAlley.com

In concert, he's unassuming: wandering onto the stage as if he has all the time in the world, and usually in a pair of ripped and dirty jeans a size and a half or so too large for his lanky frame. When he leans into the microphone, hunched over one of his amazing instruments, he talks to the audience as if they're all in on it - there are no secrets between Minnesota bluesman Charlie Parr and his fans...or maybe "friends" is a better word than fans - the intimacy Parr creates during a show is akin to friends getting together to make, and talk, about music. Once he pushes back from the mic, though, and starts to play, Charlie Parr is anything but unassuming.

Parr, a self-taught guitarist and banjo player, grew up surrounded by his music-loving father's vast collection of folk and blues records. He immersed himself in the sounds of Lightnin' Hopkins, Leadbelly and Woody Guthrie, among others, and those influences are all very apparent in his newest recording, 'Stumpjumper.'

At the same time, however, 'Stumpjumper' is a bit of a departure for Charlie Parr. For one thing, it's the first album he'll release on his new label, Red House Records. For another, it's the first time Parr has recorded a solo album with a band and while at times his voice seems to be nearly overwhelmed by the additional instruments (perhaps a question of needing to be mic-ed a little closer?), the additional instrumentation ultimately serves as a nice foil to Parr's own unique guitar and banjo style. This is especially evident on the title track, which essentially serves as a sort of musical biography of Charlie Parr.

There's also a 7-plus minute retelling of the biblical story of Lazarus ("Resurrection"), a musical recreation of a conversation Parr overheard - a couple talking about what they didn't like about each other ("Evil Companion"), and some thoughts on getting older and watching how a family's dynamics shift ("Over the Red Cedar"). Charlie Parr, it seems, is inspired by anything and everything and, thankfully for the listener, he explains his inspirations in his liner notes.

Parr also shares the overarching theme of 'Stumpjumper,' which stems from a single song, the bluesy murder ballad "Delia." In preparation for the album, Parr spent hours listening to various versions of the song, letting the words and images roll around in his head until he came up with his own version of the story.

Charlie Parr fans needn't worry that his decision to sign with a label and his decision to record with a backing band will change him in any way. If nothing else, 'Stumpjumper' proves that Parr's a master musician, a craftsman utterly devoted to the task at hand, and adept at using his own unique style to create something that, although totally original, very clearly has its roots in the familiar.

'Stumpjumper' will be released via Red House Records on April 28 and is available for pre-order - HERE.

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Posted by Linda Fahey at 7:35 PM

Hear It First - The Honeycutters, 'Me Oh My'

April 13, 2015

Honeycutters press for sq 300x300.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Based in Asheville, North Carolina, the Honeycutters live the roots life all the way through... even releasing their upcoming 'Me Oh My' LP on Organic Records. With singer/songwriter -- and, now, producer -- Amanda Platt at the helm, the group puts their own spin on an old form. Sure, there's a timeless quality to honest songs done up by a bunch of great players; but when Platt, Tal Taylor (mandolin), Rick Cooper (bass), Josh Milligan (drums), and Matt Smith (pedal steel, electric guitar, and dobro) come together, there's also a freshness to it.

KM: Along with folks like Claire Lynch, Nora Jane Struthers, and Lindsay Lou, you are the female leader of an otherwise all-male band. It wasn't that long ago that Hazel & Alice broke that particular glass ceiling. What's it take to wear that hat well?

AP: I'm definitely still learning! I'm not someone who particularly relishes the leadership position...it's been a good experience for me because I've had to get a lot more definitive about what I want. It's taken me a while to realize that the pure democracy model doesn't always work that well in a five-piece band.,, sometimes someone just needs to say what's happening and go ahead with it. Some days that's me.

You even stepped into the role of producer on this one. How'd that feel? And will you do it again in the future or for other artists?

I would really love to do it for other artists. I hadn't thought much about that. But I think it would be fun to play that role in a situation where it wasn't necessarily my voice and my music being produced. I did enjoy making this record. I was working with a group of people (Jon Ashley, our engineer, and the guys in the band) who I really trust and who are all supportive and uplifting. So it felt safe. Also, I just felt like I know these songs better than anyone else and that made me the best person to decide how they'd come to life.

You've said that you feel like you've found your voice with this record. Did you notice any specific breakthrough moment or internal shift that happened? Or was it a more natural, gradual arrival?

I'm not sure... I think it was pretty gradual. I'm not usually one to have big flash-of-light epiphanies. I don't love change, and it usually takes me a while to adjust and realize the good that's come out of it. The summer before we hit the studio was full of change and some pretty big emotional moves for me. I think that the air really started to clear when I was recording my vocals and I realized that I had survived all that turmoil and there was a new calmness in my voice. I just felt more in charge. Also, I think that this particular group of songs is more honest for me. I always blend truth and fiction when I'm writing, but I feel like I stayed more personal here.

Asheville seems to have a fairly flourishing music scene. Tell me a bit about that community and how you guys fit into it.

It does have a very flourishing music scene! So much variety. It's been that way a long time, and I think something that keeps it really community-oriented is that no one really moves here to "make it" like you might find in bigger cities. Plenty of folks, myself included, come here for the music and to pursue a career in it, but there's not really a strong sense of competition. Everyone in the Honeycutters plays in other bands, and it's not unusual to find two or three of us hanging out at a friend's open mic on a Monday. There's just a lot of great people and great music and great beer.

How much does geography factor into your music? Do you think you'd be the same artist if you lived in, say, Florida or North Dakota?

I'm really not sure. I think I'm definitely inspired by the traveling aspect of my job.. seeing the contrast around this country is pretty amazing, both geographically and culturally. I've never been to North Dakota. I think that and Alaska are the only two states I haven't visited, at this point.

###
'Me Oh My' will be released via Organic Records on April 21. You can pre-order HERE.

Posted by Linda Fahey at 12:29 PM

A Q & A with James McMurtry

JamesMcMurtry20142sm.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Somewhere between Texas, Virginia, Arizona, and Alaska -- that's where James McMurtry looked for himself and his voice as an aspiring young singer/songwriter. By the time his 1989 debut, 'Too Long in the Wasteland,' came to pass, he'd found both and was back in Texas where it all began. Since then, McMurtry has released another 10 records, with his 12th, 'Complicate Game,' dropping just recently. It's his first album in six years and it finds the oft-political writer turning his pen to the personal, instead.

KM: How are you adapting to the ever-shifting sands of the music business and the artists' economy?

JM: The business seems to have adapted to me. I never had much in the way of record sales. Now, nobody does, and acts like me, who already know how to tour on the cheap, are the ones still up running.

Most songwriters are either storytellers or autobiographers -- rarely are they both. Is that an instinctual or a learned divergence? Nature or nurture?

I don't know. I prefer to write fiction. I grew up in a house where fiction was written on a normal basis, so one could argue for nurture in my case. My father, by contrast, grew up in a house where no one read fiction, much less wrote it. His people read for information, 'Farmer's Almanac' and the like. He must have been born a fiction writer.

When you're writing a story, how do you choose which perspective to take? And have you ever gone back and written a companion piece from a different character's point of view?

I've never done the alternate pov companion piece. My songs start with two lines and a melody. When I hear the lines, I think, "Who said that?" If I'm lucky, I can conjure up a character who would have spoken the lines. Then I write the song either from the character's point of view or third person omniscient. Once in a while, I'll try second person.

Copyright infringement aside, do you ever worry that all the songs have been written? Or is there an infinite stream of inspiration to tap?

You can always use different words, different grooves, melodies . . .

On the new record, you focus on the personal more than the political. While those approaches can be equally powerful, do you think we'll ever get to a time when songs like "We Can't Make It Here" are no longer a necessary part of the equation?

There will be protest songs as long as people are pissed off. Let's hope they remain pissed off rather than apathetic.

###

James McMurtry's 'Complicated Game' is out now on Complicated Game Records and is available HERE.


Posted by Linda Fahey at 8:26 AM

Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150402

April 8, 2015

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150402. Aired between April 3 - 9, 2015. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

Hour 1

Sam Bush - The Wizard of Oz - King of My World - Sugar Hill

Tom Paxton (live) - My Favorite Spring - Live for the Record - Sugar Hill

Chuck Brodsky - Bonehead Merkle - Last of the Old Time - Red House

The Steel Wheels - Find Your Mountain - Leave Some Things Behind - Big Ring Records

The Steel Wheels - Help Me - Leave Some Things Behind - Big Ring Records

Pentangle - Springtime Promises - Basket Of Light - Shanchie

The John Renbourn Group - John Barleycorn - A Maid in Bedlam - Shanachie

John Renbourn - The English Dance - The Black Balloon - Shanachie

Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz and Aoife O'Donovan - Crossing Muddy Waters - Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz and Aoife O'Donovan - Sugar Hill - Yep Roc

John Hiatt - God's Golden Eye - Crossing Muddy Waters - Vanguard

Sufjan Stevens - Should Have Known Better - Carrie & Lowell - Asthmatic Kitty Records

Norman Blake - Blake's Rag - Wood, Wire & Words - Plectrofone Records

Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys - Everything Changed - Ionia - Lindsay Lou Music

Pokey LaFarge - Wanna Be Your Man - Something In the Water - Rounder

Steve Goodman (Jethro Burns) - Take Me Out to the Ballgame - Affordable Arts - Red Pajamas


Hour 2

Donovan - Give It All Up - Sutras - American

Pharis & Jason Romero - Backstep Indi - A Wanderer I'll Stay - Lula Records

Liz Longley - Peace of Mind - Liz Longley - Sugar Hill

Anna & Elizabeth - Little Black Train - Anna & Elizabeth - Free Dirt

Anna & Elizabeth - Very Day I'm Gone (Rambling Woman) - Anna & Elizabeth - Free Dirt

The Punch Brothers - Boll Weevil - The Phosphorescent Blues - Nonesuch

Lonnie Johnson - Playing With the Strings - Steppin' On the Blues - Columbia

Amos Lee - Mountains of Sorrow - Mountains of Sorrow, Rivers of Song - Blue Note

The Honeycutters - Jukebox - Me Oh My - Organic Records

Ellis Paul - Jukebox On My Grave - American Jukebox Fables - Philo

Feufollet - Tired of Your Tears - Two Universes - Feufollet Records (Thirty

Sloan Wainwright - Tired of Wasting Time - Life Grows Back - Derby

Ryan Adams - Tired of Giving Up - Ryan Adams - PaxAm Records - Blue Note

The Mavericks - What Am I Supposed To Do - Mono - The Valory Music Co.

Phillips, Grier & Flinner - Dixie Hoedown - Looking Back - Compass

Caroline Spence - Hard Headed, Hard Hearted - Somehow - Caroline Spence


Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 36 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes, Live 365 and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 4:11 PM

Video Premiere: Sam Lewis, "3/4 Time"

April 6, 2015

Sam-Lewis-375x375.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Following the trail blazed by guys from Leon Russell to Sturgill Simpson, Sam Lewis applies his soulful voice and poet's heart to a new batch of tunes on his upcoming sophomore effort, 'Waiting On You.' The album brings some of the best Nashville has to bear out to support the young singer/songwriter, including Will Kimbrough, Darrell Scott, Gabe Dixon, and the McCrary Sisters.

On the breezy lead track, "3/4 Time," Lewis lets his inner optimist out for a romp, though it took some coaxing to actually emerge. He started writing the song in Nashville, but didn't call it a wrap until he'd hopped the pond and was spending some time in rural England last summer. Eventually, what began as a simple exercise in tempo and mood turned into one of the set's most solid offerings.

"This song initially began as a response to the simple fact that my new batch of material lacked an upbeat, 'happy' song," Lewis explains. "The lyrics changed significantly from start to finish because I wasn't happy with the pessimistic tone that was taking shape. The glass is usually half-full to me and I felt inclined to convey more of that mindset than taking the song down some negative path which was where it was obviously headed in the beginning. Sometimes happy songs come from frustrating situations and may even inspire us or at least make us feel like we are not alone. I only hope this comes across when you listen to '3/4 Time' even though the song is actually in 4/4."

###

Sam Lewis' 'Waiting On You' will be released on April 21 on Brash Records and is available for pre-order - HERE.


Posted by Linda Fahey at 10:26 PM

A Q & A with Pokey LaFarge

Pokey Press 2015 400 baseball square.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Pokey LaFarge may have been a slow kid, but he sure is a quick study. Growing up in Normal, Illinois, he found inspiration in guys like John Steinbeck, Muddy Waters, Ernest Hemingway, Willie Dixon, Jack Kerouac , and Bill Monroe. After high school, the aspiring songwriter hitchhiked his way around the country. Add all that up, and it's no wonder that LaFarge has become a thoroughly literate, highly prolific, traveling roots musician releasing his seventh full studio album in less than 10 years, the much-anticipated Something in the Water.

KM: Let's start off with some life lessons... It seems like you listened well to your elders (your grandparents, specifically), but then you took a risk and spent some time hitchhiking around the country. Looking back from now, what advice would you pass on to the next generation of traveling troubadours?

PL: Don't take anything anyone says too literally, but keep it in mind. Don't settle for what others may say is pre-ordained. Get out of town and see the world. Juxtapose what you've been taught with what you learn. Don't disregard anything...

Your old-time sound gets recorded on vintage gear and tape, but then it's squished into mp3s. Is that somewhat disheartening to you or is it just the cost of doing business in the 21st century?

Nope, not disheartening at all. I actually use digital and analog recording technology. I think both a Victrola and a laptop have their purpose. It's whatever helps the song, the performance, and the recording.

It seems like old-time music is enjoying a renewed interest lately. Are more people playing it, are they playing it better, or are more people just paying attention?

I don't know if there are more people playing now or better than, say, 30 years ago when the folk revival sort of died out. I certainly think that are more people paying attention by the day. I think the Internet is a great tool for exposure to this music. It's accessible and it means that not everyone needs to go out digging for records to get their hands on to this music. I think, to the credit of some of my peers, they've done a bang up job of harnessing some of the early, early greats and brought it into the future.

Do you feel like you were born in the wrong decade or are you okay being a musical ambassador to another era?

Not so much. I'm much more excited about the opportunity the future brings and, thus, feel much more excited about the potential of being an ambassador to the coming times.

Having bounced around between different band configurations and label affiliations, how are you feeling about where you are now and where you're headed?

Well, I know two things to be true: First, I'm not in complete control of the future; but, second, I know that I've become successful doing one thing -- being myself. So I'll continue doing just that -- whatever that is...

###

Pokey LaFarge new album, 'Something In the Water' will be released on April 7 via Rounder Records and is available for pre-order - HERE.


Posted by Linda Fahey at 10:12 AM

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