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Hear It First - Pharis & Jason Romero, 'A Wanderer I'll Stay'
Folk Alley Presents 'Heaven Adores You' at the Cleveland International Film Festival
Video Premiere: Joel Rafael, "Thanks for the Smiles"
PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150226
Album Review: Robert Earl Keen, Happy Prisoner: The Bluegrass Sessions
PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150219
Song Premiere: Joe Pug, "The Measure"
Album Review: The Bros. Landreth, 'Let It Lie'
A Q & A with Nora Jane Struthers
Album Review: Andrew Combs, 'All These Dreams'
A Q & A with Rhiannon Giddens
Album Review: Caroline Spence, 'Somehow'
Hear It First - Elana James, 'Black Beauty'
PLAYLIST - Folk Alley nationally syndicated weekly radio show #150212
It Takes Two - Ten Classic Duets for Valentine's Day
PLAYLIST - Folk Alley nationally syndicated weekly radio show #150205
Song Premiere: Ryan Culwell, 'I Think I'll Be Their God"
Hear It First - Jorma Kaukonen, 'Ain't In No Hurry'
Album Review: Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, 'Medicine'
PLAYLIST - Folk Alley nationally syndicated weekly radio show #150129
Album Review: Gretchen Peters, 'Blackbirds'
A Q & A with Caitlin Canty
PLAYLIST - Folk Alley nationally syndicated weekly radio show #150122
PLAYLIST - Folk Alley nationally syndicated weekly radio show #150115
Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King
PLAYLIST - Folk Alley nationally syndicated weekly radio show #150108
A Q & A with Pieta Brown
Folk Alley's Best of 2014 - Jon Nungesser's Top Picks of the Year
Folk Alley's Best of 2014 - Chris Dudley's Top Picks of the Year
Folk Alley's Best of 2014 - Barb Heller's Top Picks of the Year

 

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folk alley's open mic Genevieve Charbonneau Open Mic is the place for unsigned, undiscovered or otherwise under-exposed artists to post their music and take Folk Alley's online corner stage.

This month's featured Open Mic artist is Genevieve Charbonneau  from Cowichan Valley, BC.
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Mandolin Orange - "Old Ties & Companions" from 'Such Jubilee'



Folk Alley Blog

Hear It First - Pharis & Jason Romero, 'A Wanderer I'll Stay'

March 6, 2015

Pharis and Jason Romero Wanderer 200.jpgWhen you're putting together your list of the best duos in folk and roots music, it probably includes names like Johnny & June, Emmylou & Gram, and Gillian & David. Well, here's another for your short list: Pharis & Jason Romero. The couple from Horsefly, British Columbia (pop. 1000, in the foothills of the Cariboo Mountains) writes and sings modern day folk ballads - tales of wandering, loneliness and "local characters" with an independent spirit - that will challenge you to identify which are original compositions and which come from long-forgotten songbooks off a dusty shelf. All this deftly played on vintage and newly handcrafted instruments (Pharis plays a c. 1943 Gibson J-45; Jason plays his J. Romero banjo #10250, a gourd banjo and a c.1934 Gibson L-00) and sung with sublime vocal harmonies that blend and intertwine effortlessly. Seriously. What more could you ask for?

On the heels of their acclaimed 2013 release, 'Long Gone Out West Blues,' Pharis & Jason are now set to release 'A Wanderer I'll Stay.' It's their third album together as duo, and once again they deliver. The new 12-song collection was recorded at their rural home studio - where they also build finely crafted custom made banjos in their J. Romero Banjo Co. shop - and was co-produced by David Travers-Smith (The Wailin' Jennys, Jayme Stone, Oh Susanna, Jaron Freeman-Fox and The Opposite of Everything).

'A Wanderer I'll Stay' will be released in the U.S. on Thursday, March 12 and you can stream the album in its entirety until then in the player below.

Click HERE to pre-order at iTunes or order directly from Pharis and Jason's website - HERE.

Posted by Linda Fahey at 11:32 AM | Comments (0)

Folk Alley Presents 'Heaven Adores You' at the Cleveland International Film Festival

heaven.jpg"His heart would be broken to know that people discover him and just think that he's super bummed - it was only a small fraction of who he really was." That's a quote from Dorien Garry, Elliot Smith's former publicist, in Heaven Adores You. Her sentiment is shared by director Nickolas Rossi, who focuses his riveting documentary on celebrating Smith's personal and musical accomplishments, rather than zeroing in on the tabloid drama that still surrounds his alleged suicide. It's a refreshing approach that gives fans a deeper look at who he was as a person, told through intimate interviews with his peers and loved ones. What's revealed here is a more balanced view of an ordinary guy who struggled with his demons, but was loved for his generosity, kindness, and sense of humor.

Heaven Adores You will be screened two times:
Sunday, March 22 at 9:30 p.m. at Tower City Cinemas
Monday, March 23 at 5:45 p.m. at the Beachland Ballroom (part of the Neighborhood Screenings series)

Regular ticket prices are $13 for CIFF members and $15 for non-members. By using the code "FOLK," station members can receive a $2 discount on their CIFF tickets good for any Festival Film (unless otherwise specified). Members can purchase tickets online at www.clevelandfilm.org, through the Ulmer & Berne Film Festival Box Office in the lobby of Tower City Cinemas, or by phone at 877-304-FILM (3456).

Posted by Ann VerWiebe at 10:20 AM | Comments (0)

Video Premiere: Joel Rafael, "Thanks for the Smiles"

March 5, 2015

Baladista Joel 200.jpgThe saying is - the best writing comes from writing what you know, and based on Joel Rafael's life experiences and 50 or so years of making music, he has a deep well from which to draw. He's been an avocado farmer, political activist and a draft dodger. He got busted in Portland, Oregon in the 60s. He's among the best Woody Guthrie students, proponents and interpreters we have. And he's a loving husband and a father. With his new album, 'Baladista,' his ninth, Joel presents us with ten new ballads that look back on and are influenced by those rich life experiences. The album was recorded in his studio at his ranch in North San Diego County, California, accompanied by Greg Leisz, James "Hutch" Hutchinson, John Inmon and Terry "Buffalo" Ware.

The song "Thanks for the Smiles" is a sweet reflection on the love of his life over many years and many miles. Joel says, "When you've spent half a century of your life with another person, there's a lot to look back on, and when you're on the road, those memories of times spent with loved ones make the best company."

'Baladista' is due out on April 14th on the Inside Recordings label, and is available for pre-order HERE at iTunes and HERE at Amazon.com.


Posted by Linda Fahey at 9:31 AM | Comments (0)

PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150226

March 3, 2015

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150226. Aired between February 27 - March 5, 2015. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

Hour 1

John Prine - Please Don't Bury Me - Great Days: The John Prine Anthology - Rhino

Elephant Revival - Lexington - Break In The Clouds - Ruff Shod

Eric Bibb (live) - Don't Ever Let Your Spirit Down - An Evening With Eric Bibb - M.C. Records

Rhiannon Giddens - Shake Sugaree - Tomorrow is My Turn - Nonesuch

Canadafrica: Mike Stevens and Okaidja Afroso - Abifao - Where's the One? - Borealis

Caroline Spence - Whiskey Watered Down - Somehow - Caroline Spence

Mandolin Orange - Waltz About Whiskey - This Side of Jordan - Yep Roc

Gretchen Peters - Black Ribbons - Blackbirds - Scarlet Letter

Guy Clark - Magdalene - Workbench Songs - Dualtone

Marcia Ball - The Squeeze Is On - The Tattooed Lady And The Alligator Man - Alligator

Red June - Gabriel's Storm - Ancient Dreams - Organic Records

Joe Pug - Bright Beginnings - Windfall - Lightning Rod

Martin & Eliza Carthy - Died For Love - The Moral of the Elephant - Topic

Jake Bugg - Pine Trees - Shangri La - Island


Hour 2

Justin Townes Earle - Wanna Be Strangers - Single Mothers - Vagrant

Altan - Seamus O'Shanahan's - Harvest Storm - Green Linnet

Asleep at the Wheel - House of Blue Lights - Very Best Of - Relentless

Neil Young (live) - Ohio - Massey Hall 1971 - Reprise

Sultans of String (feat. Dala) - Heart of Gold - Move - McKhool

Caitlin Canty - Unknown Legend - Reckless Skyline - Caitlin Canty

Robinella & The CC Stringband - Honeybee - 2003 37th Kent St. Folk Festival - WKSU exclusive recording

The David Wax Museum - Beekeeper - Carpenter Bird - The David Wax Museum

Robert Earl Keen - East Virginia Blues - Happy Prisoner: The Bluegrass Sessions - Dualtone

Martin Sexton - Doin' Something Right - Mixtape of the Open Road - Kitchen Table

Elana James - Only You - Black Beauty - Snarf Records

Elana James - Ripple - Black Beauty - Snarf Records

Ben Howard - She Treats Me Well - I Forget Where We Were - Republic

Fiddlers 4 - Pickin' The Devil's Eye - Fiddlers 4 - Compass

Tom Waits - Long Way Home - Orphans (Bawlers) - ANTI


Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 36 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes, Live 365 and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 5:55 PM | Comments (0)

Album Review: Robert Earl Keen, Happy Prisoner: The Bluegrass Sessions

March 2, 2015

REK Happy Prisoner 300.jpgby Elena See for FolkAlley.com

Oh, bluegrass. There's nothing better if you're feeling good about your life - that fast picking guitar fills you with all sorts of positive energy. There's also nothing better if your whole world is falling apart - just listen to a murder ballad or two and you'll realize that, hey, life COULD be a lot worse. It's an awesome genre, bluegrass. And it's a genre that has inspired Texas country legend Robert Earl Keen for decades.

REK grew up listening to the likes of Bill Monroe, Flatt and Scruggs, the Carter Family, the Stanley Brothers - the list goes on. The technical virtuosity of some of those players inspired him to push himself toward becoming the great musician he is today. That same virtuosity, he says, is one reason why he has waited this long to try his own hand at bluegrass. During a recent interview with the Amarillo Globe-News, he said that while he loved the music, he didn't have the chops to be "a true bluegrass player." Now, while technically that may be true, his genuine enthusiasm and respect for the genre more than makes up for any technical - or, I suppose, traditional - skills he may be lacking. And, he's got an amazing cast of musicians along for this bluegrass ride, too. (Among others, banjo player Danny Barnes and fiddler Sara Watkins, in addition to his own remarkable touring band.)

Now, when I listened to the album through the first time, I admit I was a little...startled. REK still sounds like REK - gritty, twangy, almost surly at times...a legend of outlaw country music. But then I listened again. And again. The more I listened, the more I enjoyed REK's interpretations of these songs - they're stories, after all. And REK is a masterful storyteller.

'Happy Prisoner' IS a tribute recording, sure - but at the same time, REK very clearly puts his own stamp on classics every bluegrass fan has probably heard - "Hot Corn, Cold Corn," "Poor Ellen Smith," and "Walls of Time" (with harmonies by Peter Rowan and a little bit of a "story hour" from Peter Rowan, too). And his duet with Natalie Maines on "Wayfaring Stranger"? Wow. REK's tenacious twang, twining with Maines' rather strident voice - it's shiver-inducing.

Something else special about REK's Happy Prisoner? There are 5 extra tracks he recorded for the vinyl version of the album. The stand out for me? "I'm Troubled, I'm Troubled." There are lots of versions of this song (Flatt and Scruggs, Doc Watson, Jerry Garcia...) and this one might be my favorite of them all. REK enunciates the lyrics so clearly it's like he's right there in the room with you and the blend between his voice and the banjo - well, it's darn near perfect. And, in true REK fashion, he manages to infuse enough heartache and sorrow into his voice that you just want to put an arm around his shoulder and tell him it'll be ok. Someday.

#####

Robert Earl Keen's 'Happy Prisoner: The Bluegrass Sessions' was released Febraury 10th on Dualtone Records and is available HERE for CD or HERE for vinyl with five bonus tracks.


Posted by Linda Fahey at 10:59 AM | Comments (0)

PLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150219

February 28, 2015

Thumbnail image for Folk-Alley-Logo_medium.jpgPLAYLIST: Folk Alley nationally syndicated radio show #150219. Aired between February 20 - February 26, 2015. Hosted by Elena See

Artist - Title - Album - Label

Hour 1 (feat. our in-studio session with Kristin Andreassen w/ Jefferson Hamer and Alec Spiegelman)

David Francey - Wanna Be Loved - The Waking Hour - Red House

Wendy MacIsaac - Dear Christy - Off the Floor - Wendy MacIsaac

The Sparrow Quartet - Taiyang Chulai - Abigail Washburn & The Sparrow Quartet - Nettwerk

Martin Sexton - Pine Away - Mixtape of the Open Road - Kitchen Table

Barnstar! - Darling - Sit Down! Get Up! Get Out! - Signature Sounds

Kristin Andreassen - The New Ground (in-studio) - Folk Alley in-studio session recording - Kristin Andreassen

Kristin Andreassen - 'Simmon (in-studio) - Folk Alley in-studio session recording - Kristin Andreassen

Kristin Andreassen - Daybreak (in-studio) - Folk Alley in-studio session recording - Kristin Andreassen

Old Crow Medicine Show - Sweet Amarillo - Remedy - ATO

The Earls of Leicester - Shuckin' the Corn - The Earls of Leicester - Rounder

Rosanne Cash - When the Master Calls the Roll - The River & The Thread - Blue Note

Steve Earle & The Dukes - Ain't Nobody's Daddy Now - Terraplane - New West

Brandi Carlile - Touching The Ground - Give Up The Ghost - Sony​


Hour 2

Elana James - High Upon A Mountain - Black Beauty - Snarf Records

Denis Murphy - The Mountain Road - Classic Celtic Music - Smithsonian Folkways

Ollabelle - High on a Mountain - Ollabelle - Riverside Battle Songs - Verve

Lake Street Dive (live) - You Go Down Smooth - Another Day Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis - Nonesuch

The Avett Brothers (live) - Head Full of Doubt/Road Full of Promise - Another Day Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis - Nonesuch

The Punch Brothers - My Oh My - The Phosphorescent Blues - Nonesuch

Catherine Maclellan - Winter Spring - The Raven's Sun - Catherine Maclellan

The Oh Hellos - Hello My Old Heart - The Oh Hellos EP - F-Stop Music

The Secret Sisters - Lonely Island - Put Your Needle Down - Universal Republic

Bob Dylan - Why Try To Change Me Know - Shadows In the Night - Columbia

Pokey LaFarge - Something In the Water - Something In the Water - Rounder

Stefan Grossman - Lottie's Blues - Yazoo Basin Boogie - Shanachie

Caroline Spence - Trains Cry - Somehow - Caroline Spence

John Cowan - Why Are You Crying - Sixty - Compass

New Grass Revival - One Love - People Get Ready - On the Boulevard - Sugar Hill​


Folk Alley's weekly, syndicated radio show is produced by WKSU (NPR-affiliate in Kent, OH). The show is available for free to stations via PRX.org or via FTP for non-PRX members. Stations may air the show as either a one-, or two-hour program. The Folk Alley Radio Show is presently carried by over 36 stations nationally. Folk Alley also presents a 24/7 hosted Internet channel available at FolkAlley.com, TuneIn, iTunes, Live 365 and more. :: for more information contact Linda Fahey at 518-354-8077: Linda@folkalley.com

Posted by Linda Fahey at 8:30 AM | Comments (0)

Song Premiere: Joe Pug, "The Measure"

February 27, 2015

Joe Pug Windfall cover 300.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Though he hails from Maryland, singer/songwriter Joe Pug has bounced from Chicago to Nashville to Austin in his search for a place in the world. But that's just geography. Pug, long ago, found where he fits artistically, and it's somewhere down the line from Bob Dylan, John Prine, Steve Earle, and John Hiatt. Like those musical influences -- and literary ones like Raymond Carver and John Steinbeck -- Pug is a storyteller. He's proven that, already, with two EPs and two albums, but his new 'Windfall' should sway any lingering doubts.

KM: The new record is produced very simply. Financial constraints for everyone being what they are these days, how much of that decision was artistic versus practical?

JP: Our original vision for the record was of a painting with only three or four primary colors. And we accomplished that, which I'm proud of. Because the ease of modern recording has actually made it a lot harder to keep things OFF an album than to put them ON. Choose a Bandcamp page at random and you'll likely hear an album that is, in the scheme of things, amazingly recorded with string sections and the full complement. In the age of the Internet, everybody can play the musical saw and everybody has a weird friend from high school that plays pedal steel. But that doesn't mean it all belongs on a single album or a single song. Unless, of course, that's someone's vision... their terrible, terrible vision.

Even in its simplicity, it never feels short-changed. If the songs can stand up in that setting -- and they seem to -- then you're onto something. Were there tunes you had to set aside for a rainy day? Songs you wanted to save for a more formal affair?

Thanks, I feel the same way. And, no, we didn't pull any punches. Anything that ended up on the cutting room floor was either thematically inconsistent with the album or plainly not good.

I don't know what makes a recording session a more formal affair. A famous name behind the console? A studio cabinet that has the obligatory "Sinatra-sang-through-this" microphone? A bunch of guys splicing two-inch tape while they disagree about vintage compressors? This is just what the music I enjoy sounds like.

Each songwriter has a slightly different approach to the creative process. Do you feel like songs come to you or from you?

I feel like there's a constant stream of melody and lyric right below the conscious surface. When it's time to write, you just try to put yourself in a mental state where you can dip your cup into that stream and bring it back to waking life.

There's a line in "The Measure" that's "All we've lost is nothing to what we've found." Unpack that a little more for us. It seems like a reminder to be grateful rather than greedy.

That was the original kernel for the song. It comes from a quote from Frederick Buechner's 'Godric,' which we've actually made the epigram for the album: "The secret that we share I cannot tell in full. But this much I will tell. What's lost is nothing to what's found, and all the death that ever was, set next to life, would scarcely fill a cup." I thought it was a beautiful phrase and tried to write a song that did justice to it.

The theme of resilience comes through in a number of the songs. What's the distinction, for you, between being resilient and being resigned?

Great question. In fact, I think you've really discerned the crux of the album. The difference lies in the personal choice between one and the other, between resignation and grateful acceptance. You can't change your lot in life but you can change how you experience it.

###

Joe Pug's 'Windfall' comes out March 10th on Lightning Rod Records and is available - HERE



Posted by Linda Fahey at 8:05 AM | Comments (0)

Album Review: The Bros. Landreth, 'Let It Lie'

February 26, 2015

Bros Landreth Let It Lie.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

It's a little hard to believe that the Bros. Landreth hail from Winnipeg, Manitoba, because of how well they carry the Southern rock mantle of the Allman Brothers on their debut album, 'Let It Lie.' Led by David and Joey Landreth, the foursome does an admirable job of copping a style and a sensibility foreign to their own environs. After all, the Manitoba prairie is a long way from the Mississippi delta.

But the Bros. Landreth get it done with the chunky groove of "Our Love," the Dobro and harmonies of "Firecracker," and the gritty blues of "I Am the Fool" and "Runaway Train." When they turn it down a bit, songs like "Let It Lie" and "Greenhouse" are stark enough to put the frailty of Joey's voice front and center. While it works well enough in those settings, it can't quite get where it's trying to go on some of the bolder cuts. Luckily, though, 'Let It Lie' is chock full of far gentler melodies and a much smoother approach than blues-rock bands usually chart.

Yes, these brothers draw from those other brothers, but that's just a starting point. From there, they wander off into styles more reminiscent of bands like the Eagles, Gov't Mule, Little Feat, and others. Heck, the melodic progression and vocal phrasing on "Tappin' on the Glass" is right out of the Jackson Browne playbook. Even still, the Bros. Landreth meld it all into a sound that works for them... and pretty much anyone else who appreciates a solid roots-rock set. There's just a whole lot to like about this record.

'Let It Lie' is out now on Slate Creek Records and is available - HERE.

###


Posted by Linda Fahey at 1:05 PM | Comments (0)

A Q & A with Nora Jane Struthers

February 25, 2015

Nora Jane Struthers Wake cover 300.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword), FolkAlley.com

With her latest outing, singer/songwriter Nora Jane Struthers is shaking things up. Not only did she recruit a new backing band -- the Party Line -- but she also took cues from the records of Americana stalwarts Hayes Carll and Jason Isbell when she went into the studio. Those two decisions melded together in her 'Wake,' a self-produced, rougher-edged work bristling with energy and enthusiasm more so than any album she's previously issued. Road-testing the songs and fine-tuning the arrangements first helped, but, really, the main difference was that Struthers was in love.

KM: A lot of artists say they don't write as well when they are happy, that they need the suffering and sorrow of heartbreak as a muse. But you've sort of come alive in the midst of a new love, right?

NJS: Yes, surprisingly! In love, I reached new depths of vulnerability and empowerment. I find inspiration in newness.

Is there a difference in your creative process for this new album or was it strictly an emotional shift, switching to the autobiographical perspective?

Well, there was definitely an emotional shift. I was also able to unbridle the creative process -- to stop editing and judging while creating. This was very freeing.

When you write very personal songs, how do you leave space for listeners to insert themselves into the stories? Or do you just have to set that concern aside?

I think the more personal a song is, the more universal it can be. I'm not concerned with how other people will interpret a song when I am writing it; after all, we all bring our own life experiences to our interpretation of art.

What's the trick for bridging the gap between the pairs of opposites in your life -- "bluegrass and Pearl Jam" or, even, Brooklyn and Nashville?

I spent many years trying to compartmentalize the seemingly contrary elements of my life; it seemed simpler at the time. But, when I fell in love, I wanted to be known fully, and in order to allow that to happen, I needed to allow all the parts of myself to exist simultaneously. It was incredibly freeing. I had no idea how much energy I was using to keep all the parts of myself separated. Now I have so much more energy to spend in far more valuable ways.

How did you know the players who form the Party Line were THE players for you? Did the players come first and the sound emerge from there... rather than you having a vision and seeking out folks to fit it?

How did you know?! Yes, I picked the people and the people happened to play these instruments and that's how the sound was born. Music is made by people... without wonderful people, I cannot make wonderful music.

###

Nora Jane Struthers & the Party Line, 'Wake' was released on February 24 and is available - HERE.


Posted by Linda Fahey at 10:59 AM | Comments (0)

Album Review: Andrew Combs, 'All These Dreams'

February 23, 2015

All These Dreams cover 300.jpgby Kelly McCartney (@theKELword) for FolkAlley.com

Prince was right: Albums still matter. And Andrew Combs seems to know that. He also seems to know that songs and production also matter, if the album is to be worth its weight in vinyl. On 'All These Dreams,' it's obvious -- even with a casual listen -- that Combs put his focus on the songs first and everything else followed from there. The model is the same as the one employed by the singer/songwriters of the late '60s and early '70s to which this album nods and winks -- guys like Glen Campbell, Jim Croce, Paul Simon, Mickey Newbury, James Taylor, and Harry Nilsson.

From the opening steel strains of "Rainy Day Song" on through the closing coda that is "Suwannee County," Combs' melodies and voice, coupled with Jordan Lehning and Skylar Wilson's production, manage to look back while facing forward. It's a fairly miraculous musical feat the team has achieved here. Even though Combs hasn't even hit 30 yet, "Nothing to Lose" is straight out of 40 years ago; "Long Gone Lately" -- with its timpani, tremolo, and castanets -- would make Roy Orbison proud, if not jealous; and "In the Name of You" rivals all the best Jackson Browne piano ballads.

The comparatively rollicking romp of "Foolin'" also recalls Orbison even as it takes on the falsity of lives presented on social media. That's the beauty of contrasting worlds at play, right there. While the chipper ditty that is "Strange Bird," the country yarns of "Pearl" and "Suwannee County," and the mildly defiant heartbreak in "Bad Habits" all call from different corners, Combs, Lehning, and Wilson do a superb job of coaxing them into the fold. As more nuanced part of the intricate arrangements, even Combs' lazy diction and casual delivery lend themselves to the vintage vibe. He doesn't attack these songs; he leads them, ever so gently to where they need to be. Tack on Steelism's Jeremy Fetzer (guitars) and Spencer Cullum Jr. ( pedal steel) along with bassist Mike Rinne and drummer Ian Fitchuk, and you have yourself one hell of a record.

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Andrew Combs' 'All These Dreams' will be released on March 3 on Coin Records and is available HERE:

Posted by Linda Fahey at 9:18 PM | Comments (0)

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